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Copyright © 1997-2021 by GTTransGlobal

Imagery is in the Public Domain

GTTransGlobal is a trademark of GTTransGlobal

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is a trademark of GTTransGlobal

All rights are reserved under the trademark and copyright laws of the United States

Trademarks

Trademark Basics - USPTO

Copyrights

Copyright Basics - USCO

"Is federal registration of my mark required?

No. In the United States, parties are not required to register their marks to obtain protectable rights. You can establish “common law” rights in a mark based solely on use of the mark in commerce, without a registration."

― United States Patent and Trademark Office, Department of Commerce, Published on September 2020, p. 9

"Copyright is a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States to the authors of 'original works of authorship' that are fixed in a tangible form of expression. An original work of authorship is a work that is independently created by a human author and possesses at least some minimal degree of creativity. A work is 'fixed' when it is captured (either by or under the authority of an author) in a sufficiently permanent medium such that the work can be perceived, reproduced, or communicated for more than a short time. Copyright protection in the United States exists automatically from the moment the original work of authorship is fixed.1

1This circular is intended as an overview of the basic concepts of copyright. The authoritative source for U.S. copyright law is the Copyright Act, codified in Title 17 of the United States Code. Copyright Office regulations are codified in Title 37 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Copyright Office practices and procedures are summarized in the third edition of the Compendium of U.S. Copyright Office Practices, cited as the Compendium. The copyright law, regulations, and the Compendium are available on the Copyright Office website at www.copyright.gov."

United States Copyright Office, Library of Congress, Revised December 2019, pp. 1 & 9

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